Your address will show here +12 34 56 78
blog post

After 32 hours of travel from our homes in Kingston to our hotel in Accra, we have had such a friendly welcome to Ghana!

Today we had a warm reception from FBNBank. We all gathered in their boardroom and spent time meeting each other and talking about plans for 1MT. They are such gracious hosts. In addition to providing us with a warm welcome to Ghana, they also shared their positive and hopeful views for this project in the long term and have promised their support and partnership! We are thrilled to have FBNBank as partners and look forward to working with them in the coming years.

We all left the bank with our goody-bags of ‘swag’: mugs, planners, and pens. We posed for some pictures outside in the amazing Ghana sunshine and left with a great sense of hope for the ongoing success of 1MT. 

We have another busy day tomorrow. Part of our day will be spent in schools! We are so excited to meet teachers and students…

0

blog post
75 years after Canada’s formation and 75 years ago, a dark cloud of war covered much of the world. Children in schools half a world away from the fighting were not spared from the effects of World War II. There was a shortage of teachers during and after the Second World War. This undermined efforts which had started prior to the war to improve the qualifications of teachers. Changes were happening in the classrooms too. Heavy iron and wood desks that had previously been bolted to the floor in rows were replaced with lighter desks that could be moved around the classroom and laid out in different ways to suit new and different teaching methods. 1940s – The enrollment of students dropped by almost 100,000 in the ten years between 1935 and 1945, from 2,132,000 to 2,039,000. 1945 – World War 2 ended on May 8th – 1946 Khaki University was re-established overseas to provide morale and education to soldiers waiting to return home. 1950s – Free public education until the end of highschool had become the norm across Canada. 1950 – There were 2,391,000 enrolled in schools across Canada, 352,000 more than just five years earlier. The biggest jump Canada had seen up to that point. 1951 – As the trend moved towards urban from rural, many rural schools closed and in urban and suburban areas elementary and high school separated. 1955 – Enrollment in schools across Canada jumped again, there were 3,118,000 students enrolled in 1955. That was 727,000 more than in 1950. 1956 – The Elementary School Teacher’s Certificate replaced the 1st Class designation for teachers who had completed grade 13, this designation had been in place since before confederation. 1958 – The enrollment at schools across Canada jumped by another 514,000 in the three years since 1955. 1959 – There were 187,000 more students enrolled than the year before and that was a jump of more than a million and a half since 1950. The “baby boom” would continue into the 60s. 1960s – The end of segregated school systems in Canada. – Many universities tripled enrollment due to the “baby boom” and 90% of the funding for Canadian universities came from the government. 1960 – Across Canada, there were twenty eight universities that offered graduate level courses. – More than 70% of educators were women. 1961 – The Elementary School Teacher’s Certificate was divided into four levels: Standard 1 was a one year program, Standard 2 was the one year program plus 5 university credits, Standard 3 was plus ten, and Standard 4 was the original one year program plus completion of a bachelor’s degree. 1965 – Student enrollment across Canada was at 4,918,000. A difference of 1.8 million over a decade before. 1969 – Bill 63 is passed in Quebec requiring children taught in primarily English schools to learn a working knowledge of the French language. 1970s – Graded schools with separate rooms for each grade became the rule for urban and suburban areas, while one room graded education still existed in rural areas. – Approximately 60% of educators were women. – Computers were introduced to schools during this decade. 1971 – Toronto Board of Education banned “the Strap” and corporal punishment. 1974 – More than 34% of the staff in the aboriginal education system had native status following control of the education plan being given to band councils and Indian education committees from the government. – Quebec’s Bill 22 required all immigrants to that province to be enrolled in French language schools. 1975 – According to a publication by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, there were 34 provincial schools and 174 federal schools that provide native language programs in 23 different languages 1976 – There were now forty-seven universities offering graduate level courses in Canada 1977 – Bill 101 made French the official language of Quebec and education in French became mandatory for immigrants including those coming from other Canadian provinces unless there was a “reciprocal agreement” between Quebec and that province. 1979 – 15 residential schools were still running. Following an evaluation, by the Department of Indian Affairs, a plan was enacted to help the administration of these schools to become more culturally aware of the needs of aboriginals. – Legislation in Newfoundland was changed to say that students with special needs “shall” be accepted, rather than the more exclusionary “may” that it had been before. – York and North York school boards banned “the Strap”. 1980’s – There was an echo of the Baby Boom between 1980 and 1990, and with it, there was an increase in school populations between the mid-’80s and mid-’90s. 1980 – Equality in education was advancing as teaching was being seen less as “women’s work” and 55% of educators were women. – Teachers in the Calgary Board of Education went on strike, the strike lasted into the summer for a total of 125 days, 44 of which were school days. 1982 – Computers were becoming a regular part of high school in Ontario, Alberta, and BC. Students using them for subjects such as Math and English. 1989 – Beginning this year and through to 1997, the governments of the Yukon, North West Territories, Nunavut, Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Quebec all amended their education acts to ban corporal punishment and “the strap”. 1990’s – With decreasing enrollment, schools began closing and funding for education decreased 1996 – The last federally run residential school in Canada, the Gordon Residential School in Saskatchewan was finally closed. 1997 – From October 27th to November 7th, 126 000 teachers went on strike in Ontario to protest reforms by the Mike Harris provincial government. This was the largest teacher strike in North American history. – A poll on the knowledge of Canada found that the average Canadian student could only answer 10 of 30 questions about Canada correctly and that only 30% of them could identify the first prime minister of Canada. Do you know who the first prime minister was? (answer at bottom) 1998 – The Government of Canada recognized and apologized for its role in the development and administration of residential schools to those affected by them. – The last band runs residential school, St. Michael’s Indian Residential Schools, finally closed. 2002 – 21,000 teachers from across Alberta went on strike in what was the largest labor disruption in the province’s history. -In Quebec, Bill 104 closed the loophole which allowed access to English language schools. This bill was overturned in 2007 at the provincial level and by the Supreme Court of Canada in 2009. 2003 – The Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey found that 99% of Canadian schools had computers available to students and teachers and just over 90% of those computers were connected to the Internet. 2004 – The Supreme Court of Canada banned the use of corporal punishment as classroom discipline. This was officially the end of “The Strap” though the practice of corporal punishment had fallen out of favour decades sooner in much of Canada. 2010 – Under pressure from the Canadian Supreme Court to create a law that did not violate the rights in the Canadian Constitution, the Government of Quebec introduced Bill 103 requiring students to receive English education in private schools for three years before accessing the public system in English. Now – We are beginning to see schools being built with more focus on sustainability and accessibility. – For the first time, in some areas, Catholic and separate schools share one building. – There is a growing trend towards technology in the classroom. Canada as a unified nation is still quite young, and change in some areas has been slow, but the continuing trend is towards a more inclusive and positive educational environment. It will be interesting to see how Canadian education changes in the years to come. *The first prime minister of Canada was Sir John A. MacDonald.
0

blog post
As the 2016-2017 school year draws to a close, and our nation is about to celebrate her 150th birthday, it’s an interesting time to look at how our educational system has changed over those years. For ease of reading, we have broken the timeline into the first 75 years of Canada’s educational system and the second 75 years. During the 19th century, the focus of education turned away from the home and towards a classroom setting. By the mid 19th century Canada was putting together the pieces of a modern school system, establishing the roles of funding, control, and participation. School systems across Canada began to develop very similarly due to school promoters reading each other’s work and working together. Education of the Native North American peoples was conducted separately from that of the settlers and immigrants. Residential schools were established with little oversight and managed by various religious groups. The intent was for the First Nations people to assimilate to the customs and culture of the newly forming country. This was a terrible injustice to the First Nations people and amounted to cultural genocide. While attempts at reparation have been made, this is a piece of our common history which should not be forgotten. Early Canadian curriculum consisted of lessons in Mathematics, reading, and writing, and later geography and history were added. Education also included religious instruction and focussed on social skills. The main focus of early school systems was not academic but focussed on solving problems like crime, poverty, and homelessness. 1867 – Canada became a country, there were 723,000 students enrolled in schools, but the average daily attendance was only 40.7%. – With much controversy over the language and religion of schooling, the Constitution Act of 1867 put educational standards in the hands of each province and territory. Any separate school systems that existed in provinces at the time they joined the Confederation were deemed legitimate. – There was strong opposition to teachers and curriculum from the US, so Ontario imported materials from Ireland, with a focus on teaching both Protestant and Catholic backgrounds. Irish immigrants were also the majority of the population of Ontario at this point in time. 1868 – Quebec created its first Ministry of Public Instruction. 1869 – With the Common School Ordinance of 1869, British Columbia introduced public education to the province. 1870’s – Composition is added to the Canadian curriculums. 1870 – Manitoba was obligated to provide education in French by the Manitoba Act of 1870. 1871 – Compulsory free schooling was first instituted in Ontario, it was the first province to do so. Free public schooling was provided in both English and French. Private schools existed where schools charged for admission, but public schools were paid for by the government and through taxes. – Schooling was usually completed by the age of 14, and Canada instituted some of the longest summer breaks globally to account for children being able to work on family farms. 1874 – The agricultural college opened in Guelph Ontario, this was not the first college, but the first to open since Canada became a country. – The telephone was invented. 1875 – Quebec’s Ministry of Public Instruction is shut down under pressure from the Catholic Church. 1877 – The University of Manitoba was founded and began accepting students. This was not the first university in Canada, but the first to be founded since Canada became a country. 1880’s – Fine arts like music, literature, and drawing were introduced to Canadian classroom curriculums. 1885 – There were 911,000 students enrolled in schools and the average daily attendance was just over half at 53.3%. 1890’s – By this point, Children were expected to attend free compulsory education throughout most of Canada. – Although still taught in one room school houses, children were taught at different grade or “book” levels, the standard eight levels of education became the norm. – Physical education and health, manual training, nature and agricultural study, and household science are introduced to Canadian curriculums. – Electricity was introduced to classrooms. 1890 – With a larger Anglophone population to Francophone, the Manitoba Schools Act was passed, cutting off funding for separate (French Catholic) schools. – The first Kindergarten education is introduced. 1895 – 1,011,000 students were enrolled in schools and the average daily attendance was 59.8%. 1897 – “The strap” which was used to strike students on the palms of their hands as a form or corporal punishment was standardized. It was 15 inches long, 1.5 inches wide and made of rubber. 1900 – At the turn of the century, there were 1,055,000 students enrolled in schools and the average daily attendance had jumped to 61.2% 1908 – The first high school for girls, the Collège Marguerite-Bourgeoys, was opened in Montreal. 1910 – Half day special education classes were offered in Toronto (among the first of their kind in Canada) for students with disabilities and learning differences. 1912 – In Ontario, Circular No. 17 made English the official language of education and banned the use of French in schools past the first grade. 1913 – Circular No. 17 was rewritten to allow for 1 hour of French teaching per day. 1914 – World War 1 begins – Over 80% of children between the ages of 5 and 14 attended public schools – War related educational materials were developed for students in both elementary and high schools. Teachers in Quebec did not generally incorporate the war into their lesson plans. 1917 – The Khaki University (originally the Khaki College) was set up by Canadian forces in Britain, under the leadership of Dr Henry Marshall Tory. Standardized textbooks were approved by all the Canadian provinces and the program worked not only to expand education but to improve the morale of the troops. It served as the prototype for other systems in other countries. 1918 – The end of World War I. 1919 – In Ontario the Adolescent School Attendance Act was passed, requiring children between the ages of 14 and 16 to attend a legally recognized school. Students who were exempt for health or employment reasons had to attend part time schooling. – The Canadian government passed the Technical Education Act, encouraging and funding the education of students in industrial and mechanical trades. 1920’s – Compulsory schooling instituted in Quebec. 1925 – Just under 2 million (1,993,000) students were enrolled across the country, and average daily attendance was the highest it had been at 77.3%. 1929 – The Great Depression began. The 1930s – Teaching jobs were hard to find as more teachers were trained than there were jobs to fill. – In rural areas of the prairies, teachers taught grades 1-8 or even 1-11 in one room schoolhouses, many without running water. The teachers also often boarded with farmers, in a teacherage or in the schoolhouse. 1931 – Between 1931 and 1934, the province of Alberta dropped funding for schools by almost a million dollars. 1935 – In the later half of the 30’s the focus of education began to shift away from memorizing and drilling, and towards actively doing and exploring the interests of the children. 1936 – Alberta’s School Act was amended to create rural school divisions, this allowed more educational opportunities for children and allowed more students the opportunity to attend high school. 1939 – The beginning of World War II. – Reduced funding for education led to the reduction of materials, the cutting of courses, and postponement of building new schools. – There was a shortage of teachers due to the manpower crisis caused by the war. – Tech and vocational classes focussed on fulfilling war production needs. – Children of German and Japanese descent were often ridiculed and bullied by their peers and seen as foreigners even if they were born in Canada. – Schools participated in blackout drills to prepare for the threat of bombing, which thankfully never came. 1940 – “Guest children” were evacuated from Britain and came to Canada, they lived with foster families and attended Canadian schools. Over 7000 “guest children” came to Canada during the war. Most returned to Britain and their families before the end of the war. 1941 – After Canada went to war with Japan, children of Japanese descent were pulled out of their schools and they were sent with their families to internment camps as they were seen to be a threat to Canadian security. Half way through the history of Canada as a country was a dark time, not only for Canada but for the world. The glamor of war was lost as this war was televised. No side came out without blood on their hands. Canada as a nation stumbled and fell a few times in the first half of its young life. There were decisions made that none of its descendants are proud of. Amid all of that, there was a movement, slow as it may be, towards a more modern and inclusive educational system. Although the system is still not perfect and Canada as a nation is still struggling to find it’s true identity, we hope you will come back and read the second half of this timeline and see how far we have come.
0

blog post
1 Million Teachers – “An Educated Society is a Stronger Society” Hakeem Subair is a man on a mission. Growing up in Nigeria, Hakeem became a first-hand witness to the lack of education students receive and the lack of respect that teachers get. In early 2017, Hakeem launched 1 Million Teachers to improve the wellbeing of society through better education that is created through quality teacher training. With the help of his team, he has brought 1 Million Teachers a long way, in a short time. The Root of the Issue When Hakeem began his research, his first endeavor was to figure out why teachers were not getting the respect they deserved from society in Nigeria. Hakeem dug deeper and deeper and found the root of the issue. It came from the lack of the training teachers received which resulted in inadequacies in their performance levels. As a result, the profession of a teacher in countries like Nigeria has become somewhat taboo! Hakeem has stepped forward to change this perception. Hakeem understands and advocates that education is a fundamental right that plays a key role for humans in social and economic development. 1 Million Teachers – Education Is a Fundamental Right The more society is educated, the more likely individuals can acquire employment opportunities, better health care, and even begin to engage in the political process. As education rises, statistics have shown a direct correlation with a decrease in poverty levels, a decrease in birth rate, and many other factors that can help stabilize a country’s overall socio-economic success. The Solution The source of achieving this kind of success in educational levels comes from creating effective and impactful teachers. Currently, there is a massive shortage of teachers globally that is expected to grow to an estimated absence of 69 million teachers. The shortage of teachers is unevenly distributed with Sub-Saharan Africa being the most affected by this shortage. 1 Million Teachers is designed to solve this issue through 3 tactics. Recruiting More trained (United Nations Standards) Teachers Training teachers who are not yet qualified Incentivizing teachers towards continued growth and improvement in their teaching practices By working towards these goals, Hakeem Subair and 1 Million Teachers continue to shorten the supply and demand gap for teachers globally. 1 Million Teachers will continue to support teachers and educators long after they have completed training through continued professional development, motivation, and advocacy. As their motto goes… An Educated Society is a Stronger Society Want to Help? Firstly, make sure to follow the 1 Million Teachers’ Facebook Page and join the 10,000 other supporters! Keep up with what they’re up to and get ready to lend a helping hand! Secondly, you can spread the word about 1 Million Teachers by sharing this blog! Sharing is caring!
0